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Home/Stories and articles/Cultural Tourism...
September 2005

Santiago’s best popular spots

Two years ago, the book Santiago Bizarro showed the margins of Santiago to those readers eager for the bohemia and new experiences right in their own city. The book goes from the strange to the typical. And proves once again that tastes come in all shapes and sizes.


El Quitapena
(Recoleta 1480)

Open every day of the year (except for September the 11th), until 11 pm.

The history of "El Quitapena" is already eighty years old. Its name can be translated as something like ?the sorrow-eraser?, since it's located close to two of Santiago's biggest cemeteries, the General and Catolico. So the clients are usually people that have just buried their loved ones. One finds here typical food with a home-made quality and a noisy Wurlitzer.

The book ?Santiago Bizarro? tells the ?most glorious? tale of this place, which has to do with the time when the popular Colo Colo football club was founded, one evening of 1925. In one of these tables, players David Arellano and Clemente Acuña ?both had just quitted their former club, Magallanes? committed to create a new club, Colo Colo; now Chile's biggest.

El Hoyo
(San Vicente 375 and Gorbea, Estación Central)

It was open in the year 1912, and has kept its clients for many years. Its tables are barrels, and the house-specialty is red wine in a jar. One of the best tales here comes from the time of one of Santiago's biggest earthquakes, in March of 1985. A gringo had just arrived here and complained about his wine being too warm. When the waiter was trying to put some ice in his white wine, then came the earthquake and what he got was a scoop of pineapple ice cream originally intended for a glass of champagne. That's how ?The earthquake? was born, now one of Chile's most popular typical drinks.

Santiago now has two ?Hoyos?. The first one is in Franklin street, and the other one, near Estación Central.

La Piojera
(Aillavilú 1030, by the La Vega market)

In the last few years, La Vega ?Santiago's most popular fruits and vegetables market? has gone through big uncertainty. Many have talked about moving it in order to raise new buildings. But we can still find there its typical tents, products and best surrounding spots. One of them is La Piojera, a restaurant and bar founded in 1896. What you can do there is, mainly, drink ?a lot. Wine is mostly available, but also a peculiar mix: ?ponche de culén?. You can have a glass while eating bread with scrambled eggs, and try classic drinks such as ?chicha? (apple liquor) and ?borgoña? (wine with strawberries or peaches).

El Rincón de los Canallas
(San Diego 379-B)

Mon-Thu., midday-2 am. / Fri. and Sat., open until 7 am.

You can only get inside this restaurant after giving the correct password. The idea started as a way to avoid the law, since the owner could not pay for a permission after his former restaurant was burned. He used to give out the clue during a radio show. Since then, the password has always been the same: "¿Quién vive canallla?" "Chile libre, canalla" (?Who's there, canalla?? ?A; free Chile, canalla?).,

All the dishes here have war-related names. There's the ?Vietnamese?, a ham (leg) with "arrollado", sausages, rib, boiled potatoes and mixed salad (good for up to four people). Other ones are the ?Punta Peuco? (the name of Pinochet's assistants prison), ?Barrabases?, ?Amongelatina? and ?Vitalicio?. Clients come from all over the world, since there's also an area here called ?Los Canallas International?.

Two years ago, the book ?Santiago Bizarro? showed the margins of Santiago to those readers eager for the bohemia and new experiences right in their own city. The book goes from the strange to the typical. And proves once again that tastes come in all shapes and sizes.


El Quitapena
(Recoleta 1480)

Open every day of the year (except for September the 11th), until 11 pm.

The history of "El Quitapena" is already eighty years old. Its name can be translated as something like ?the sorrow-eraser?, since it's located close to two of Santiago's biggest cemeteries, the General and Catolico. So the clients are usually people that have just buried their loved ones. One finds here typical food with a home-made quality and a noisy Wurlitzer.

The book ?Santiago Bizarro? tells the ?most glorious? tale of this place, which has to do with the time when the popular Colo-Colo football club was founded, one evening of 1925. In one of these tables, players David Arellano and Clemente Acuña ?both had just quitted their former club, Magallanes? committed to create a new club, Colo Colo; now Chile's biggest.

El Hoyo
(San Vicente 375 and Gorbea, Estación Central)

It was open in the year 1912, and has kept its clients for many years. Its tables are barrels, and the house-specialty is red wine in a jar. One of the best tales here comes from the time of one of Santiago's biggest earthquakes, in March of 1985. A ?gringo? had just arrived here and complained about his wine being too warm. When the waiter was trying to put some ice in his white wine, then came the earthquake and what he got was a scoop of pineapple ice cream originally intended for a glass of champagne. That's how ?The earthquake? was born, now one of Chile's most popular typical drinks.

Santiago now has two ?Hoyos?. The first one is in Franklin street, and the other one, near Estación Central.

La Piojera
(Aillavilú 1030, by the La Vega market)

In the last few years, La Vega ?Santiago's most popular fruits and vegetables market? has gone through big uncertainty. Many have talked about moving it in order to raise new buildings. But we can still find there its typical tents, products and best surrounding spots. One of them is La Piojera, a restaurant and bar founded in 1896. What you can do there is, mainly, drink ?a lot. Wine is mostly available, but also a peculiar mix: ?ponche de culén?. You can have a glass while eating bread with scrambled eggs, and try classic drinks such as ?chicha? (apple liquor) and ?borgoña? (wine with strawberries or peaches).

 

 

 
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